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Lumps on the cat's body

Nodules occur on cats. They can be both dangerous and harmless but, as in other animals, they increase the risk of tumours in older individuals. Since it is impossible to know whether or not lumps are dangerous without an examination and testing by a veterinarian, the cat should always be taken to the clinic if lumps are found. This is because in the worst case a lump could turn out to be a tumour, and should then be removed by surgery. The sooner a lump is removed the better, the less time they have to grow and possibly spread, the more likely the prognosis will be more optimistic.
Tumours occur in cats just as they do in humans and other animals and the risk increases with age. Of course, it is not only older cats that can be affected by tumours, but younger cats can also become ill.
By feeling your cat regularly you can detect lumps in time and it is always better to be safe than sorry and make an appointment with a vet if you find a lump on your cat's body. The vet will often take a sample from the lump to give you a clue as to what it might be. Never wait for the lump to grow and make an appointment to see the vet immediately if you find any abnormalities in the skin.
Of course, lumps don't always have to be the worst thing, a lump on your cat's skin can be caused by an infection or an accumulation of fatty noduleswhich are harmless, but to know for sure what it is you should always make an appointment for an examination.
As tumours can develop in different organs of the body, it is difficult to pinpoint exact symptoms as they can look so different. What you can do is feel your cat regularly to see if lumps develop.
Today, cats, like dogs and humans, are treated for tumour diseases and the most common way to do this is surgically. Sometimes chemotherapy and radiotherapy are also used to shrink the tumour in cats.
A cat with a tumour can live on after treatment, sometimes for a long time afterwards. But it depends on the cat's age, the type of tumour and the cat's general status, as well as any other illnesses.

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